Nomenclature of Victoria Park

What is Nomenclature?

Nomenclature is a noun that is used to describe “1. A person’s or community’s system of names for things. 2. The terminology of a science etc. 3. Systematic naming; 4. a catalogue or register” [1]

The nomenclature or collective group of names for all the parks, reserves, streets, lanes, and roads within the Town of Victoria Park, as in any town or city, reflects its history and development as well sometimes as its geographical features. Nomenclature is named for various themes and reasons, typically the names were chosen by two groups of people. Those being primarily, land developers, back when the area was first established and land was being parcelled and sold, and also the local governing body under which the area fell at the time. The Town of Victoria Park’s nomenclature has been mainly chosen first by Peet and Co. and other real estate companies, then by iterations of local government throughout the development of the area. The iterations being the Victoria Park Roads Board (1894-1897), the Municipality of Victoria Park (1897-1917); Perth City Council (1917-1994) and the Town of Victoria Park (1994-).  The Town now has in place Policy 111 Commemorative Recognition which governs how the general public can submit a nomination for Town nomenclature (and other items) and describes the process of such nomenclature being named in honour of people, groups or events.

Major themes that have been noticed in the Town’s nomenclature at present, although research is still ongoing, are:

  • British county and town names;
  • Early settlers;
  • Geographical features of the area (past or present);
  • Mayors, councillors etc. of local government; and
  • World War I servicemen from Victoria Park who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Research into the meaning behind all nomenclature in the Town of Victoria Park is ongoing and as new information comes to light it will be added to this webpage.

Town nomenclature is listed alphabetically below in the following three main categories:

  • Suburb names
  • Lanes, Roads and Streets
  • Parks and Reserves

 

Suburb names [2] 

Burswood

Burswood is derived from "Burrs-Wood", the name given to his property by the original land holder of the area, Henry Camfield. Camfield named his property "Burrs-Wood" (two 'r's) after his father’s farm in England. The area became known as Burrswood Island in 1841 when a canal was cut through the peninsula so as to shorten the trip to Guildford. The present accepted spelling of "Burswood" is the result of a spelling error by the men who painted the sign for the first railway station in the area (now Rivervale station).

 

Carlisle

Following the opening of the Perth-Pinjarra Railway on the 2nd May 1893, Haydon's Siding was constructed near the foundry of that name to the east of Victoria Park. From 1893 to 1912, the area was gradually settled and a station was built near the siding and it was first known as Mint Street but later changed to Victoria Park East. Following a meeting of ratepayers in May 1919, the name "Carlisle" was chosen for the station. Although it is said that the station was named after the railway town in England near the Scottish border as it was considered that the area was on the border between Perth and its suburbs, it is interesting to note that manager of the South West Timber Hewers Co-operative, which purchased the land and a rail spur here in 1919 was named Carlisle.

 

East Victoria Park

Under construction.

Please check back soon.

Lathlain

Name derived from Lathlain Park Oval which was in turn named after Sir William Lathlain. The proposal for the renaming of parts of the localities of Victoria Park and Rivervale as Lathlain was suggested by the City of Perth, and was approved in 1981. Sir William Lathlain was Mayor of Perth 1918-23 and 1930-32, and also a member of the Legislative Council 1926-32.

 

St James (part of the suburb)

Under construction.

Please check back soon.

Victoria Park

The suburb of Victoria Park derives its name from "Victoria Park Estate", a development that took place here in the 1890's. It is believed the name was given to the estate because Queen Victoria was still on the throne, although it may be connected with the Melbourne suburb of Victoria Park. Victoria Park was declared a municipality in 1897.

 

Welshpool (part of the suburb)

Under construction.

Please check back soon.

 

Lanes, Roads and Streets of Victoria Park

Archer Street

 Archer-Street-street-sign-for-w-e.jpg

Archer Street (sign)

Archer Street in the suburb of Carlisle is named in honour of Archer, the winning horse of the inaugural Melbourne Cup in 1861.

Have you ever heard someone say, “I haven’t seen a wombat since Archer won the Cup”? You might at first worry about the number of wombats in the wild, but what the slang phrase really refers to is a long passage of time.

All well and good some might say, but what has that got to do with nomenclature in the Town of Victoria Park? The Archer referred to in the slang phrase, is the name of the horse that won the first ever Melbourne Cup in 1861 and won again in 1862. It was also the only horse to ever win that prize back-to-back until the 1930s. Archer Street in Carlisle was named Archer after this famous horse, probably because the early developers Harry Bickford of the Bickford Park Land Development Company and James Peet of Peet and Co. were fans of horse racing.

Archer-with-jockey-J.-Cutts-in-E.-L.-de-Mesters-colours-painted-by-Frederick-Woodhouse-Snr-Courtesy-Australian-Dictionary-of-Biography.gif

                     

Archer Street, Carlisle

Former name: Not applicable.

Official date of naming: Unknown, but suspected to be within the jurisdiction of the Victoria Park Roads Board or the Municipality of Victoria Park.

     Naming method: Unknown.      


Benporath Street

 Benporath-St-Street-Sign-Benporath-Street-Burswood-WA.jpg           Benporath-Frank-Hilton-Western-Mail-Friday-12-November-1915-p.-29-For-Nomenclature-page-on-website.jpg        

Benporath Street in Burswood is named in honour of Frank Hilton Benporath (1885-1916). Frank was an electrician by trade and had whilst growing up been involved in various military units prior to the outbreak of World War I. Frank also enjoyed cycling and often competed in amateur races. He lived with his wife Stella in Egham Street, Victoria Park (now Burswood). Enlisting just weeks after war was declared, Frank embarked in November 1914 for the Gallipoli peninsula. Wounded three times during his service, on the 16 August 1916, he Died of Wounds Received in Action. He was 31 years old.  

Read more about the life and legacy of Frank Hilton Benporath in his entry in the:

Victoria Park Dictionary of Biography

                     

Benporath Street, Burswood

Former name: Duke Street
Official date of naming as Benporath Street: 6 September 1918
Naming method: Approved by the Governor of Western Australia in Executive Council, corr. 816/18, under Section 7 of the Land Act, 1898. Published in the Government Gazette of Western Australia, no. 38, 6 September 1918, p. 1272. 
                               


Images: 

  • Benporath Street (sign), Burswood - Perth, Western Australia.
  • Bombardier Frank Benporath, 8th Battery A.F.A. (Twice wounded). 1915 'Heroes of the Dardanelles.', Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 12 November, p. 29., viewed 29 Sep 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37598809.

Benton Lane

Benton Lane in the suburb of East Victoria Park, is named for Ellis May Benton (1923-2010) who was born in Victoria Park in 1923.

Benton-Lane-EVP-sign-for-w-e.jpg

 Benton Lane (sign), East Victoria Park

Ellis was a Corporal in the Women’s Auxiliary Australian Airforce (WAAF) during World War II, enlisting in May 1942. Upon her enlistment Ellis lived with her parents at 34 Cargill Street, Victoria Park. Ellis married Ronald Albert JENKINS at St Alban's in Highgate in May 1948.

Benton-Ellis-May-service-record-photo-National-Archives-of-Australia.jpg

 Ellis May BENTON upon enlistment in the WAAAF in WWII

(Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: NAA: A9301, 99645)

Bickford Lane

Under Construction.

Please check back soon.

Bush Street

Bush-Street-sign-St-James-for-we.jpg

Bush Street in the suburb of St James is named in honour of Private James Willie BUSH, who was Killed in Action at Bullecourt, France on 1 October 1918. Lest We Forget this hero of Victoria Park

To read more about James, view his entry in the:


Buzza Street

 Buzza-Street-sign-East-Victoria-Park-for-w-e.jpg

Buzza Street in the suburb of St James was named in honour of Private John Mitchell Buzza who was Killed in Action in Belgium on 7 October 1917. Lest We Forget.

To find out more about John, see his entry in the:

Edmiston Lane

Edmiston-Lane-Victoria-Park.jpg

Edmiston Lane (sign), Victoria Park

Edmiston Lane, Victoria Park is named for Agnes Carmel Edmiston (nee Duffy) an Aircraftwoman in the Women’s Auxiliary Australian Air Force (WAAAF) during World War II.

Edmiston-Agnes-Carmel-nee-Duffy-service-record-photograph.png

Agnes Carmel Duffy (later Edmiston) at her enlistment into the WAAAF in 1942

(Courtesy National Archives of Australia, NAA: A9301, 99856)

Agnes was born to Patrick James and Catherine DUFFY in Victoria Park on the 6 July 1922. Prior to her enlistment in World War II Agnes worked as a Junior Clerk for the South Perth Road Board. She was one month shy of her 20th birthday when she enlisted on the 10 June 1942 and began training as a radio operator. Agnes had blue eyes, dark brown hair and was 5 foot, 3.5 inches tall. During the war she married Corporal Edward Clarence Edmiston of the Signals Corp in the Australian Army. Edward was also born in Perth but grew up in Leederville. The marriage took place on 10 August 1944 at St Patrick’s Cathedral in Melbourne, Victoria. Agnes and Edward survived the war, living in Applecross and Como until their deaths, Agnes on 16 September 2010 aged 88 and Edward on the 6 January 2020 aged 98.   

 

Edmiston Lane, Victoria Park

Former name: Right-of-way (ROW) 87

Official date of naming: 17 December 2019

Naming method: A recommendation was submitted to the 19 November 2019 Ordinary Council Meeting to rename three ROW including ROW 87. Council supported the recommendation to change the name of ROW 87 to Edmiston Lane. This was formalised in Resolution 271/2019 at the 17 December 2019 Ordinary Council Meeting

Read Resolution 271/2019(PDF, 84KB)

Fred Bell Parade

Fred Bell Parade in East Victoria Park is named in honour of Western Australia's first recipient of the Victoria Cross - Lieutenant Colonel Frederick William Bell (1875-1954) who served in both the Boer War and World War I. He was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1901 during the Boer War.

Geddes Street

Geddes-Street-sign-Victoria-Park-post-on-left-with-tree-leaves-behind GEDDES__CYRIL_ARTHUR__2_-courtesy-of-Faithe-Jones

Geddes Street in Victoria Park is named in honour of Lieutenant Cyril Arthur Geddes (1888-1915). He lived with his parents at 47 Berwick Street, Victoria Park, which was situated almost at the intersection with Geddes Street today. Cyril was a clerk in the civil service and was aged 26 when he enlisted in the AIF in September 1914. He was declared Killed in Action, by court of inquiry, at Gallipoli on 23 May 1915. Cyril has no known grave.


 

Geddes Street, Victoria Park

Former name: Cecil Street
Official date of naming as Geddes Street: 6 September 1918
Naming method: Approved by the Governor of Western Australia in Executive Council, corr. 816/18, under Section 7 of the Land Act, 1898. Published in the Government Gazette of Western Australia, no. 38, 6 September 1918, p. 1272. 

Read the Government Gazette, 6 September 1918, p. 1272(PDF, 226KB)  



Images:
  • Geddes Street (sign), Victoria Park.
  • 1915, Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 24 September, p. 1. (ILLUSTRATED SECTION), viewed 30 Dec 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3491764.

Goddard Street

Goddard-Street-sign-Lathlain-modified   GODDARD__ARTHUR_COOMBS_1816-Soldiers-of-Barrack-Street

Goddard Street in Lathlain is named in honour of Arthur Coombs Goddard (1894-1915). Arthur was a stove-maker who lived with his parents in Forrest Street, now Beatty Avenue, he was 19 when he enlisted in the Australian Infantry Force. Suffering a gun-shot wound to the shoulder whilst serving in the Dardanelles on the 12 May 1915, he died of these wounds two weeks later on the 26 May 1915 whilst in hospital in Cairo. He was but 20 years old. 


 

Goddard Street, Lathlain

Former name: Cambridge Road
Official date of naming as Goddard Street: 6 September 1918
Naming method: Approved by the Governor of Western Australia in Executive Council, corr. 816/18, under Section 7 of the Land Act, 1898. Published in the Government Gazette of Western Australia, no. 38, 6 September 1918, p. 1272. 
 


Images:

  • Goddard Street (sign), Lathlain
  • Dease, Denis 1914, ‘Private Arthur Coombs Goddard’ [photograph], Dease Studio, 117 Barrack Street, Perth WA. Courtesy of the State Library of Western Australia: 108168PD. 

Hampshire Street

Hampshire-St-sign-EVP.jpg           Hampshire-St-East-Victoria-Park-W.A.-Google-Maps-c2021.jpg        

Hampshire Street, East Victoria Park

Geographically speaking, Hampshire Street in the Perth suburb of East Victoria Park runs NE/SW from Albany Highway through to Devenish Street, with Berwick Street intersecting it at roughly half its length.


Previous name:

The street was first known as Bouverie Street from 1902 until 1918. The name 'Bouverie' is believed to be named for the Earls of Radnor (British peerage) whose surname is Pleydell-Bouverie, the earldom reaching back to 1765.  

 

Origin of the current name:

In September 1918, following the amalgamation of the Municipality of Victoria Park into the Perth City Council in 1917, a large number of streets across Perth were renamed in order mainly, to reduce confusion between duplicately named streets. There was already a Bouverie Street in Leederville, which got to keep its name, with Victoria Park’s Bouverie Street being changed to Hampshire Street.

It is not known why the choice of “Hampshire”, but with several other streets in close proximity being named after English counties, it is likely that it was named for this theme. Hampshire is a county in South East England that is 3,769 square kilometres in size and has an estimated population of 1,844,245. Its history can be traced back to around 495 A.D. and it appears in the Domesday Book of the 11th century, the famous survey of England and Wales, ordered by William the Conqueror.

The name ‘Hampshire’ is derived from the name of one of its two largest cities, that of Southampton. “Southampton was known in Old English Hamtun, roughly meaning 'village-town'” (1).


Early development of the street:

Bouverie street, Victoria Park, first appeared in the Wise’s Post Office Directory of Western Australia (2) in 1903 but no one was registered as living there until 1914, as three people are listed as living in the street in the 1915 edition of Wise’s Post Office Directory (3).

1915-Bouverie-St-VP-later-Hampshire-St-Wises-Post-Office-Directory-WA.jpg

One lot of land in the street, exact street number unknown, was offered for sale in The West Australian for £80. A two-room jarrah house, plus kitchen, was offered to let in Bouverie Street in 1916 for 10 shillings.

Building-lots-for-sale-in-Bouverie-St-VP-later-Hampshire-St-EVP-WAN-16-Nov-1912-p.-4.jpg

2-room-Jarrah-House-To-Let-in-Bouverie-St-VP-now-Hampshire-St-EVP-WAN-29-Jan-1916-p.-12.jpg

By 1949, there were 77 properties registered to receive mail in the street.


1949-Hampshire-Street-EVP-formerly-Bouverie-St-Wises-Post-Office-Directory-WA.jpg

By 1929 the Perth City Council had resolved to carry out a works project to provide work for the unemployed whilst “expediating work in the district”, it was at this time that Hampshire Street became a plank road

Plank roads were typical of the time and were usually made of jarrah planks or old railway sleepers, often laid in two sets of three sleepers wide, thus creating two tracks for the wheels of vehicles to pass over. Sometimes they were laid like floor boards in a long line to make a solid wooden road.

Perth-City-Council-District-Works-Authorised-The-Swan-and-Canning-Leader-27-Dec-1929-p.-7.jpg

A concerned resident, Mr T. L. Pike, of 40 Hampshire Street, wrote in 1929 to the Editor of The West Australian. Mr Pike wrote asking why his street wasn’t being considered in the City’s road work projects, which would see other streets surrounding Hampshire Street become gravel streets, yet they had less houses and residents than Hampshire Street. It is not known if there was any answer.

A-Victoria-Park-Street-WAN-14-March-1929-p.-22-Letter-to-the-Editor.jpg

A Street of Remembrance:

Research has so far uncovered that six Hampshire Street residents served in World War II, one in Singapore and two in the Middle East, the others in various areas:

  • Private Reginald Charles CARTER (WX8445)
  • Private Horace JARVIS (WX7005)
  • Private Stanley Rudolph JARVIS (WX16713)
  • Able Seaman James CRAVEN (F3599)
  • Private Alfred William CRAVEN (WX6107)
  • Private George Hazelgrove CRAVEN (WX42049)

The Craven brothers lived with their parents Enoch and Margaret Craven at 16 Hampshire Street, before enlisting. There were a total of six Craven siblings living at the address.

Private Reginald Charles Carter was married to Joyce and living in Hampshire Street when he enlisted. Below is an informal picture of the couple taken circa 1940-41, courtesy of the Australian War Memorial.
   Informal-portrait-of-Pt-R-C-Carter-and-his-wife-Joyce-c.-1940-41-Courtesy-of-Virtual-War-Memorial-of-Australia.jpg         Big-POW-Funeral-The-Daily-News-23-Octo1945-p.-7.jpg    

Privates Horace and Stanley Jarvis, brothers who also lived in Hampshire Street upon their enlistment in World War II, were both of the 2/28th Battalion, and both were captured at Ruin Ridge in Egypt on the night of 26-27 July 1942 (4). They were POW’s in Germany until the end of the war.

 P.O.W.-Released-The-West-Australian-28-May-1945-p.-4.jpg         Jarvis-Stanley-Rudolph-service-record-photographs-NAA.jpg   

Image above right: Stanley Rudolph JARVIS (WX16713), taken upon his enlistment, 24 September 1941. Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia

Alec Bell Park:

Alec Bell Park at the corner of Hampshire and Berwick Streets was named in honour of Alec Ernest Bell. Alec Bell grew up in Victoria Park attended school at Xavier College and lived at 953 Albany Highway, East Victoria Park, he was a well known and loved local postman. Alec served in the Vietnam War and died of wounds, Long Binh South Vietnam, 29 January 1968, aged 21 years.

zoom_BELL_AEJ__NSM__Photo.jpg

Image: A young Vietnamese Montagnard boy is checked for a fever by 5714453 Private (Pte) Alec Ernest James Bell of Perth, WA. The check up was part of a village Medical Civil Aid Project (MEDCAP), carried out by 7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (7RAR). Pte Bell died of wounds on 29 January 1968 in South Vietnam.Photo taken in South Vietnam Australian War Memorial - THU/68/0012/VN Maker Thurgar, Kevin Denham

The park was originally known simply as Hampshire Reserve and seems to have been established when locals in the area were advocating for a children’s play area, as there wasn’t one in Fraser Park, at the Devenish end of Hampshire Street. An article from The Workers Star, gives a reference point for the establishment of what is today Alec Bell Park:

This-Grass-is-News-[Hampshire-Reserve]-The-Workers-Star-11-Oct-1946-p.-6.jpg

 

Other happenings and stories of residents of Hampshire Street:

Two brothers win £2500 in the lotto in 1936. They were Arthur and Ernest Philpot, both had an interest in art and music, see the newspaper articles included to find out more.

2500-[pounds]-To-Victoria-Park-The-Daily-News-19-May-1936-p.-3.jpg

Two-Brothers-Share-Lottery-2500-[pounds]-The-Daily-News-19-May-1936-p.-3.jpg

Local-Artists-Success-The-Swan-Leader-29-May-1936-p.-2.jpg

One local newspaper ran a weekly recipe competition and in 1930, Nancy Edmonds of 47 Hampshire Street won first prize for her ‘Dainty Chocolate Recipe’, The Sunday Times, 25 May 1930, p. 38.


Dainty-Chocolate-Recipe-Gains-Sunday-Times-25-May-1930-p.-38.jpg

 

Accidents:

There were many reports of accidents occurring to people who lived in Hampshire Street, or where the accidents happened in Hampshire Street, but these are not included in the summary of the history of Hampshire Street. They can be found on Trove through our list here however: https://trove.nla.gov.au/list/159348


Can you help tell more of the story?

This is the story of Hampshire Street, East Victoria Park as we know it, can you add anything to the story? If you have pictures, stories or anecdotes to share please get in touch with us via: library@victoriapark.wa.gov.au, or by phone: 08 9373 5500.


References:

[1] Wikipedia contributors. (2021, December 3). Hampshire. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 08:52, December 22, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hampshire&oldid=1058409033

[2] Wise’s Post Office Directory are the postal directories for Perth and Western Australia. They have been digitised and are available via the State Library's web page.  Names listed, it should be noted, are the names of the person who was registered at the GPO to receive mail at that address. The person listed is not necessarily the owner of the property, they may have been renting. People registered their address one year and would appear in the following year’s edition The directory works by area first then alphabetically by street. Access the complete set at: https://slwa.wa.gov.au/collections/collections/post-office-directories

[3] Wise’s Post Office Directory, 1915, p. 425, online: https://slwa.wa.gov.au/pdf/battye/pods/1915/0236.pdf

[4] Stanley, Peter Dr 2011, ‘Remembering 1942: Ruin Ridge’, Australian War Memorial (online), https://www.awm.gov.au/articles/blog/1942-ruin-ridge, accessed 3/01/2022. 

Iceworks Lane

Iceworks-Lane-sign-EVP.jpg  PH077019-Looking-across-Albany-Highway-in-northerly-direction.jpg  

Above Left: Iceworks Lane (sign), on Mint Street end of the lane, East Victoria Park. Above Right: Looking across Albany Highway in northerly direction (PH077019)

This right-of way that runs from Mint Street, behind Albany Highway through to Dane Street, East Victoria Park is named “in recognition of the iceworks which existed in the area. Newspaper advertisements from the late 1940’s show that Victoria Park Ice and Cold Storage was located at 860 Albany Highway, Victoria Park, which is the property where the East Victoria Park IGA store, Tao Japanese Sushi Train and Tutti Frutti Frozen Yogurt stores are now located (2015). The owners of the iceworks were the Colley family, and Hendley Butchers were also located at the same address.

The Victoria Park Ice Works and Cold Storage

In about 1925 Bruce Hendley and his friend Ernest Colley formed a partnership, initially trading as ‘Hendley & Colley Butchers’ and later the ‘Victoria Park Ice Works.’, at 862 Albany Highway, Victoria Park (Hendley and Colley Butchers first mentioned in the Western Australian Postal Directories in 1925).

PH077011-Victoria-Park-Ice-Cold-Storage-Delivery-Truck-1960s.jpg

Above: Victoria Park Ice & Cold Storage Delivery Truck, 1960s (PH077011)  

In the 1930’s depression they faced bankruptcy and had to merge briefly with a master butcher, a Mr Jennings.  Jennings and Ernest Colley took over the property that Bruce Hendley had previously owned. Hendley was then a tenant in the property, in the shop that he had started.  This partnership with Jennings soon ended and Ernest Colley became sole owner of the property. The two friends continued as sole traders –Bruce Hendley as the butcher, and Ernest Colley in the Ice Works business. Although they were no longer in partnership, they were still closely involved, their businesses operating side by side – as the meat cold-storage room backed into the Ice Works operating area (Western Australian Postal Directories first note separate entries at number 862 Albany Road, in 1938).

PH077015-Carpark-at-rear-of-Hendley-Butcher-Shop-and-Victoria-Park-Ice-Cold-Storage.jpg

Above: Carpark at rear of Hendley's Butcher Shop and Victoria Park Ice & Cold Storage (PH077015) 

PH077018-Front-view-of-Victoria-Park-Ice-Cold-Storage-and-Hendley-Butcher-Shop.jpg

Above: Front view of Victoria Park Ice & Cold Storage and Hendley's Butcher Shop (PH077018)

In the late 1940s, The Victoria Park Ice Works and Cold Storage (as it became known) was one of, if not the biggest ice works operations in the metropolitan area. Many Ice-delivery trucks worked from there, and the business also sold direct to the public. People came from everywhere, particularly at peak times such as at Christmas and public holiday long weekends, and there was often a queue stretching back along Albany Highway, as people waited to buy ice.

PH077022-Crowd-lined-up-to-buy-ice.jpg

Above: Crowd lined up to buy ice (PH077022)

The ice works supplied other areas in metropolitan Perth: twenty ice carters would come to the factory to collect their ice around midnight, and make their deliveries to suburbs as far out as Midland with deliveries made during the night.

PH077024-Machinery-used-in-the-manufacture-of-ice.jpg

Above: Machinery used in the manufacture of ice (PH077024)

PH077025-Interior-of-ice-manufacturing-premises.jpg

Above: Interior of ice manufacturing business (PH077025)

PH077026-Interior-of-ice-manufacture-premises.jpg  

Above: Interior of the ice manufacturing premises from a different angle (PH077026)

PH077027-Blocks-of-ice.jpg

Above: Blocks of ice (PH077027)

When Ernest Colley died in 1955, his son John took over the business which was by now struggling. With the increasingly widespread use of domestic refrigerators, perishable food was no longer kept in ice chests requiring a regular supply of ice blocks.

In 1951 Ernest had already started the first in the state, self-service block ice. An article in The West Australian on Thursday 27 November 1952 talks about the new self-service initiative: “Slot Machine for Ice - An ice vending machine, the first of its kind in Western Australia has been installed at the Victoria Park Ice Works, by the proprietor, Mr. Colley. It is simple to work and will cater for the "after-hours" trade. The customer places 1/4 in the slots, turns the handle and a block of ice slides out. It had taken about three months to build the cool room and install the machine, Mr. Colley said, and had cost about £400. The machine would not make a profit, he said, but it would save him from answering calls for ice at all times of the day and night.”

In 1959 John began providing self-service crushed ice, a change that saved the business and made it once again very successful. In 1963 the business at 862 Albany Highway was bought out by G.J. Coles.

John Colley kept the machinery and set up a new self-service crushed ice business near his family home, continuing for many years before changes including the building of the new Park Centre shopping centre caused the business to struggle. John Colley closed his business and sold these premises in 1988.


References

  • Tall timber, Brown Paper and Porridge by Bob Primrose 2010
  • Interview with John Colley 2002 (Victoria Park Local History Collection)
  • The Western Australian Directory [Wise's]: Victoria Park 1937-1938
  • The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Thursday 27 November 1952, page 14


   

Iceworks Lane, East Victoria Park

Former name: Right-of-way (ROW) 52

Official date of naming: 13 October 2015

Naming method: A recommendation was submitted to the 13 October 2015 Ordinary Council Meeting to rename ROW 52 as “Iceworks Lane”. Council supported the recommendation and a unanimous vote in favour was cast.    

Read Resolution 12.3-10.2015(PDF, 523KB)                                                               

Isaia Lane

  Isaia-Lane-sign-EVP-1.jpg        Clarevale-Isaia-Pty-Ltd-and-Marias-Gift-Shop-684-Albany-Highway-East-Victoria-Park-date-unknown.-for-w-e.jpg    

Image top right: Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd and Maria's Gift Shop, 684 Albany Highway, East Victoria Park, date unkown.

Named for the Isaia family who came from Regina Calabria, in the south of Italy, Isaia Lane is a right-of-way running parallel to Albany Highway. It runs from Miller Street through to Mint Street. Rocco Isaia started R Isaia and Sons, a liqueur manufacturing company on the site in 1955. By 1961 R Isaia and Sons amalgamated with another business called Clarevale Wines and became Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd.


As Rocco Isaia Jnr recalls…”and then with the wines came a few other Australian spirits such as brandy, run and then slowly slowly as the business became more known and there was more demand we started to grow and expand and started including a lot of other products. We started importing from overseas you know the whisky, the gin, the vodka, the French brandy, bourbon, tequila, and we use to import all our flavourings and essences that we needed for the manufacturing of liqueurs from overseas, from Italy, France. And we used to buy the alcohol that was required for the manufacturing of liqueurs from Colonial Sugar. That was the spirit that we bought and the range of our products just grew you know we finished up with a very large range of products.”(1)


From the late 1960s “Maria’s Gift Shop” operated as part of the business and was very popular, staying in operation right till the business was closed in 1998. As Rocco Junior explains “ Dad [went] back home to Italy [in 1967]… while they were over there they sort of looked around and came back and they bought all this these gift lines and made contacts over there of suppliers of gift type products and that’s when they opened up a shop that we called Maria’s Gift Shop, which was right next door to the factory. Under the same roof! Because when Pop built the factory originally you know that was let out to real estate agents and things like that but then you know different people that were looking for office space in Victoria Park and then when they went to Italy and came across all these gift lines and gift ideas and chandeliers, crystal chandeliers and some beautiful Meranno Venetian glass wear and all that sort of stuff that they brought over. Some beautiful items! The chandeliers were exquisite and any way they more or less let the tenant know that they required the shop and that’s when they started the gift shop which went very well for a while there as well. My sister was running that for a while, my sister Mary. That’s who it was named after and you know that was in 19 say roughly 19…late ‘60s, ‘68, ’69 and they got the shop going and that was there pretty well right till the end, until you know we closed down the whole operation.”(1)


Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd was a distinctive landmark in the area and is well remembered by current and former residents, as well as by many people from the wider Perth area. The family themselves were well loved and respected community members also. The iconic pine tree in the park at Isaia Corner was planted by the Isaia family in what was then the backyard of their home and of their liqueur shop outlet. The exact date it was planted is unknown but aerial photographs show that is was planted sometime between 1953 and 1965.


References:

  1. ‘Interview with Rocco Isaia Jnr’ 2004, Jan McCahon Marshall, Victoria Park Library Oral History Collection.


 

Isaia Lane, East Victoria Park

Former name: Right-of-way (ROW) 107

Official date of naming: 19 March 2019

Naming method: A recommendation was submitted to the 19 March 2019 Ordinary Council Meeting to rename ROW 107. Council supported the recommendation to change the name of ROW 107 to Isaia Lane. This was formalised in Resolution 14.3.1/19032019.

Read Resolution 14.3.1/19032019(PDF, 493KB)

Images below: Various 'flavours' of Isaia Liqueurs that are part of the Local History Collection, Town of Victoria Park Library Service. These bottles and others in the collection were donated in May 2020 by Brendan Beeson.

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Kent Street

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Kent Street in the suburb of East Victoria Park is named in honour of Charles William Forester Kent a former Town Clerk of the Municipality of Victoria Park from 1899 until 1903.

Charles was born in London, England in 1845 to William Henry Forester Kent who worked as a solicitor and Alice Puttnick. It is unclear at present when he emigrated to Australia, but he was working as an accountant in Malvern, Victoria in 1893 when he married Jessie McLow, who’s father was a coach-builder from South Australia.

Charles and Jessie had six children, Forester Charles, Dorothy Grace Russell, Alice Elizabeth Phillips, Phyllis Jessie, Marjory Harriet and Harry Philip. Three of whom were born in Malvern, Victoria before the family moved to Perth, Where Phyllis was born in 1901.

In 1899 Charles Kent took up the role of Town Clerk in the barely three-year-old, Municipality of Victoria Park (formed in 1897). Charles quickly became very popular and relied upon for his dedication to the community, attention to detail and commitment to the role. Charles was also involved in many other groups; he was Secretary of the Victoria Park Board of Health and was also involved in the Metropolitan Bicycle Club and frequently officiated as timekeeper for competitions. Many of these races used Albany Road, as it was then named, as their cycleway, racing from Victoria Park Hotel to Kelmscott Hotel. A distance of 25 miles as reported in 1902 (1), the winner covering this distance in 1 hour and nine minutes.

Charles and his family lived in Mackie Street, Victoria Park, possibly No. 6 or No. 8.

On Tuesday 7 April 1903, Charles became famous for disappearing! He enjoyed the evening meal with his family in Mackie Street, and strolled to the Broken Hill Hotel for a drink with a few friends whereafter he was expected at the Council Chambers (where John Hughes’ car yard is now located), for the regular fortnightly meeting of council, but he did not arrive. Interestingly when the door to the Town Clerk’s office was forced open that evening, Charles’ gold watch, chain and ring were found, most worryingly for those assembled and his family, they also discovered a box of cartridges for a revolver, with one missing! Thankfully no more was said about the revolver once Charles was found. Following is an article from The Daily News, on Thursday 9 April…

“Strange Disappearance, of the Town Clerk of Victoria Park. The Lost Found

“The excitement caused in the city yesterday when it became generally known per medium of ‘The Daily News’ that Charles William Kent, the well-known town clerk of Victoria Park, has as suddenly disappeared as if the ground had opened underneath his feet and swallowed him up, was in a great measure allayed this morning on its becoming known that Mr Kent has been positively seen yesterday at Guildford. But when the intelligence arrived in the city that he had again for the second time disappeared, there was more excitement.

“From inquiries made it transpired beyond all doubt whatever that Mr Kent spent pretty well the whole of yesterday afternoon at Guildford. A gentleman who knows him well engage him in conversation and directed his attention to the notification of his disappearance in the ‘News’. He retorted to the effect that he had not during the last five missed a single night from the council meetings, and that he thought that one night wouldn’t matter much.

“In this connection it may be mentioned that Mr A. G. Russell, ex-Mayor of Victoria Park, for a like period had never missed a night – a capital record, by the way. When yesterday afternoon it became known that the whereabouts of Mr Kent had been discovered some of his friends took train and journeyed out of Guildford. Judge, however, of their astonishment on learning that he had suddenly again vanished from the neighbourhood! He was last seen somewhere about 5 o’clock in the vicinity of the railway station reading a copy of ‘The Daily News’, and inquiring what time the train left for the goldfields.

“What makes the matter all the more mysterious is the fact that an examination shows everything to have been left in perfect order.

“The police are now busily engaged in tracing the whereabouts of Mr Kent, whose family naturally became very much alarmed at his sudden disappearance. Mrs Kent since the departure of her husband has been confined to her bed. Shortly after midday Mounted-constable Stow came on Mr Kent on foot out at the mulberry Plantation. Mr Kent was then walking in the direction of Bunbury Bridge. The police constables questioned him as to why he did not go back home, and at once allay all anxiety as to his whereabouts. To this the other replied, ‘I got out of my reckoning’. In reply to further inquiries he said that he had not been drinking and as a matter of fact he had had only two drinks. ‘But’ he added, ‘I’ve had nothing to eat.’ Still talking to Mr Kent, the officer learned that he (Kent) had walked as far as Smith’s Mill. Shortly after this a friend of Mr Kent’s arrived – Mr Milligan – in a buggy, and with him Mr Kent drove back home to his residence, Mackie street, Victoria Park.

“TWO DAYS JOURNEYINGS – MR KENT TELLS HIS STORY.

“TO Constable Stow, who discovered him, Mr Kent gave the following narrative of his doings from the time he was missed until he was found. He said that on the night he disappeared, after leaving the hotel, he sat on the hill at the back of the hotel for a long while in a state of semi-stupor, with no definite knowledge of doing anything or going anywhere, and quite careless of what happened to him. By and by he began to walk, or rather, he says, he became conscious that he was walking. In the morning he found himself at Smith’s Mill, and then he wandered aimlessly back again. He had not slept the whole night. Towards midday he found himself in Guildford, and remained about there all day. By the 6.30pm train he came to Perth and continued his uncertain wanderings about the outskirts of the city. He remained out in all the rain, but made no effort to seek shelter, and eventually stretched himself on the ground to rest beside a log. He slept soundly, despite the boisterous inclemency of the weather. The evidence that he made no selection of a suitable spot in which to rest is shown by the state of his clothes, which are encrusted with mud. Though he had nothing to eat since his disappearance he had no desire for food, and he began to wander again. Constable Stow saw him in the mulberry plantation near the cemetery, and took charge of him. He looks completely broken down, a terrible wreck, and he says that he had no idea where he was going, but if her could have got our of Constable Stow’s way he says he would have done so.

“Mr Kent was taken to his home and put to bed. Dr Brown was sent for, and he found that Mr Kent was in a very bad way, and recommended that he should have entire rest for a week or more.

“There is a special meeting of the Victoria Park Council this afternoon, and an application will be made for a fortnight’s leave of absence for Mr Kent, which it is understood will be granted.

“It appears that Mr Kent suffers from Bright’s disease*, a malady which in forms affects the brain strangely at odd times, and this is supposed to offer the true explanation of Mr Kent’s strange conduct” (2)

It remains a mystery to this day exactly what happened to Charles, but later some money was found to be missing from the accounts and there was speculation that Charles may have been involved, however nothing of the sort was ever substantiated. It may have been possible that foul play was involved in Charles’ disappearance and the ‘fugue state’ that he experienced over more than 24 hours. A ‘fugue state’ being a dissociative state of mind where people act like normal, even talk to their friends etc, but have no recollection of what has transpired after the occurrence. One imagines it entirely possible that when Charles was enjoying a drink with friends at the Hotel, that it was spiked in order to implicate him in some foul play. It may have also been done to prevent Charles from testifying in Police Court about a case involving the theft of bank notes to the value of £10,000 from the Bank of Australasia (3) in which three men (not Charles) were implicated. Charles’ was supposed to have appeared at the Police Court the morning after he was reported missing.

Soon after returning to work from a period of leave for respite, Charles Kent retired as the Town Clerk of Victoria Park and by 1904 he and his family are recorded as living in New Zealand. Charles and Jessie were to have two more children in Oamaru, New Zealand in 1904 and 1906. Charles first worked as an accountant for a small business that sold pianos before winning the position of Town Clerk of the Oamaru Borough Council. He served in this role with great distinction from 1908 until 1932. He enjoyed a short retirement in which he continued his long community involvement in various community and philanthropic efforts. In his obituary and many newspaper articles in New Zealand, Charles Kent was highly praised and regarded for his work, his artistic talent and personal integrity. He died in Oamaru, New Zealand on 7 March 1934.

“At the Oamaru Borough Council meeting last night the Mayor (Mr M. F. Cooney) referred to the passing of Mr C. W. Kent, who was a former town clerk, saying that they had lost a very valuable and respected citizen. Mr Kent had done splendid work while town clerk, which had been mentioned by many citizens on his retirement. They had lost a citizen who had given of his best to the community whether in patriotic, social, or aesthetic movements. Mr Kent had taken a full share in furthering the interest of Oamaru. As town clerk he was an unqualified success. He had brought to that position a wide experience and that essential quality of tact. The sympathy of the whole community went out to Mrs Kent and family in their sorrow. The council carried a resolution of sympathy with the relatives.” (Otago Daily News, Issue 22207, 9 March 1934, p. 12)

Do you have photographs of, or stories of Charles Kent and his service to the Town of Victoria Park? We would love to hear about them. Please be in touch by phone 08 9373 5500 or email vicparklibrary@vicpark.wa.gov.au


Notes

*Bright’s disease is not associated with the mind, and the name of Charles’ suspected condition was most likely wrongly quoted in this newspaper article from the time.

Images:

  • Kent Street (sign), East Victoria Park
  • C W Kent - NZ Truth, Issue 1075, 1 July 1926, p. 6

References:

(1) 1902 'M.B.C. ROAD RACE.', Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 26 July, p. 26. , viewed 17 Aug 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37545961

(2) 1903 ‘STRANGE DISAPPEARANCE’, The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 – 1950), 9 April, p. 1. (SECOND EDITION), viewed 11 Aug 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article83164990 

(3) 1903 'THE ROBBERY OF BANK NOTES.', The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), 6 March, p. 5. , viewed 17 Aug 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article24856513

Marchamley Street & Place

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Marchamley Street (and Marchamley Place) in the Perth suburb of Carlisle has appeared on maps since the early days of land development in the area, at which time it was part of the estate known as “Bickford Gardens” that was being developed and sold by Peet and Co.


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Many streets in Carlisle are named for British counties and towns. Marchamley Street in Carlisle was named for the hamlet of the same name in Shropshire, England in the United Kingdom (Longitude and Latitude of the British Marchamley: 52.86069638006206, -2.597341689516096).


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In other research it was discovered that Hawkestone Street (the original name of Orrong Road) was named for the Perth home of property developer James Thomas Peet. Further research, has uncovered that James Thomas Peet was born in Nottingham England and attended Lord Rowland Hill’s Tenantry School, Hawkestone, Shropshire. The Hill family being the long standing owners of Hawkestone Hall, and were also benefactors of a local school at the nearby hamlet of Marchamley.

James-Peet-c.-1900-011465d.jpg

The name of Marcemeslei first appeared in written records in the Doomsday book of 1086, which was the first official census type record of England. The name Marchamley comes from the Anglo-Saxon ‘Merchelm’ and ‘-leah’. As ‘Leah’ means a wood or clearing in the wood and ‘Merchelm’ is an Old English personal name derived from ‘Merc, Mierce, Miercum (plural)’ which means Mercian. From which we can derive that Marchamley is either a ‘woodland clearing of a man called Marchelm’ or a ‘woodland clearing at (the territory of) the Mercians’ (1). Thus the name goes back to the days before England existed as a nation state, when it was a country of many different kingdoms including the Kingdom of Mercia.

   Shropshire-Marchamley-Lodge-RP-1914.jpg        Bay-Tree-Cottage-School-Lane-Marchamley-Shropshire-England.jpg        


In Doomsday times it was recorded that there was a chapel at Marchamley which was under the diocese of Hodnet and there was also a mill and a wood for “fattening pigs”. By the 12th Century local farming tenants took their name from the village of Marchamley. “In around 1200, John de Marchamley died and his elder daughter inherited the manor. She sold it to Henry de Audley. With Hawkestone, Marchamley passed to the Hills and was later sold again. In 1841 there were 84 houses and 441 inhabitants. At this time, Viscount Hill was the principal land owner. In the directory of 1851, local residents include farmers, a shopkeeper, an architect and builder (also a farmer), a police constable and a blacksmith” (2). The township according to Bagshaw’s ‘History, Gazetteer and Directory of Shropshire’ (3) was 1,424 acres in size and contained 29 parcels of land, with Viscount Hill being the principal landowner in the township, who’s residence was Hawkestone Hall.


The name Marchamley was also perpetuated in the Peerage of the United Kingdom by the 1908 creation of the title of Baron Marchamley (5).


References:

(1) Mills, A. D. 2011, A Dictionary of British Place Names, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom, 1st edn rev., p. 317.

(2) Hodnet Parish Council 2021, ‘Marchamley and Hawkstone’, Hodnet.org.uk, accessed online: https://hodnet.org.uk/main/index.php/local-history/local-villages/marchamley-and-hawkstone/.

(3) Bagshaw, Samuel [1851], History, Gazetteer and Directory of Shropshire, The Project Gutenberg, online: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/62250/62250-h/62250-h.htm#page290.

(4) Map of Marchamley 1880, Ordinance Survey County Series, The Francis Frith Collection: https://www.francisfrith.com/marchamley/marchamley-1880_hosm53133.

(5) Wikipedia contributors. (2022, April 30). Baron Marchamley. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:11, May 18, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Baron_Marchamley&oldid=1085473675


                                                                                                                                                                                          

Marchamley Street, Carlisle

Former name: Not applicable

Official date of naming: circa 1910

             Naming method: By original property developer Peet & Co.        

 Published: 26 May 2022.

McMaster Street

 McMaster-Street-street-sign-with-beautiful-big-gum-tree-from-reserve-showing-behind.jpg          McMaster-Robert-Thompson-from-Battye-Cyclopedia-of-WA-with-caption    

McMaster Street in Victoria Park is named in honour of the first Mayor of the Municipality of Victoria Park - Lieutenant Robert Thompson McMaster (1865-1915). An architect by profession, several fine examples of his work still stand within the Park and wider Perth. He served as a Captain in the Boer War of 1899-1902 and as Lieutenant in the 10th Light Horse Regiment in World War I. He was Killed in Action at Walkers Ridge, Gallipoli on 7 August 1915.

Read more about the life and contribution in his entry in the:

Victoria Park Dictionary of Biography


 

McMaster Street, Victoria Park

 

Former name: Hereford Street
Official date of naming as McMaster Street: 6 September 1918
Naming method: Approved by the Governor of Western Australia in Executive Council, corr. 816/18, under Section 7 of the Land Act, 1898. Published in the Government Gazette of Western Australia, no. 38, 6 September 1918, p. 1272. 

Read the Government Gazette, 6 September 1918, p. 1272(PDF, 226KB)

   

Nurse Lane

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 Nurse Lane (sign), East Victoria Park

Nurse Lane in the suburb of East Victoria Park is named thus to honour the work done by midwives and nurses in general in the area.

At the August 2013 Ordinary Council Meeting (OCM) they approved the names: “Mary Jones Lane” or “Jones Lane” as options to be sent to the Geographic Names Committee (GNC) of Landgate. “Mary Jones Lane” as a name was not approved by the GNC as it is against policy to have double barrelled names before the suffix.

Both names were “suggested as a name for the Right of Way in recognition of the midwifery work carried out in the area by Nurse Mary Jones. Nurse Jones operated a private midwifery hospital at 23 Canterbury Terrace from approximately 1920 to 1932. She then ran a private hospital at 6 Basinghall Street from approximately 1933 to 1938, and later St Ives Maternity Hospital at 159 Hubert Street from 1938 to 1943. Nurse Jones died in Mosman Park in 1968, aged 80. It is not known how many babies Nurse Jones delivered in the Town, but as she was a midwife in the area for over 20 years, it is expected that there would be numerous.” (1) But the GNC also rejected the name ‘Jones Lane’ for the ROW as there were already many Jones Lanes across the Perth metropolitan area.

At the Ordinary Council Meeting of 12 August 2014, council recommended ‘Nurse Lane’ to the GNC which was accepted.


 

Nurse Lane, East Victoria Park

Former name: Right-of-way (ROW) 39

Official date of naming: 12 August 2014

Naming method: A request to rename ROW 39 was received and a recommendation was presented to Council for “Jones Lane” and “Mary Jones Lane” to be submitted to the Geographic Names Committee (GNC) of Landgate for approval at the 13 August 2013 Ordinary Council Meeting (OCM). The GNC did not support. At the 12 August 2014 OCM the name ‘Nurse Lane’ was recommended to the GNC and was subsequently approved.

Read Resolution 12.4/2014(PDF, 510KB) 


(1) Town of Victoria Park, 2014, Ordinary Meeting of Council Minutes, 12 August 2014, Town of Victoria Park, Victoria Park, Western Australia, p. 57

Orrong Road

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Orrong Road runs along the side of the suburbs of Lathlain, Carlisle and Welshpool, and forms the border of that side of the Town of Victoria Park.

This four-lane dual carriage way road is a major arterial road, connecting many parts of metropolitan Perth and allowing easy access to the Airport and CBD among other places. It’s tree-lined central median was planted with trees in the late 1980’s early 1990s when the road underwent construction as Graham Farmer Freeway was also being constructed.


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Orrong road was gazetted in 1937 and was made from five original streets: Hawkstone Street, Prospect Road, Burswood Avenue, Nichalls Avenue and Wickalls Avenue. It was named after a similar styled access road in Melbourne, but the name itself stretches back to the mid-19th Century.

“The area bounded by Orrong Road, Malvern Road, Kooyong Road and Toorak Road [Melbourne] sold at the sale of Crown Land on 27th June 1849 and became the site of several significant mansion developments. Lots 27 and 28 were purchased by James Jackson, who was later to build Toorak House on the north side of Toorak Road. Lot 28 included 55 acres between Irving Road and Clendon Road.

“In 1852 Alfred Ross, a merchant, purchased lots 28 and 29. Kearney’s map of 1855 shows Orrong, the first house to be built in the area, located midway between Gardiners Creek Road (Toorak Road) and Commercial Road (Malvern Road), with its entrance drive on the south-east corner of Gardiners Creek and Orrong Roads.

“Orrong’s large estate was gradually subdivided and by 1890, John Horsfall had transformed the house, by then on 2 acres, into a forty-roomed mansion. Toorak was by this time considered the ‘vice-regal district’ and the proximity to Toorak House, Victoria’s first Government House, and the undulating land, attracted Melbourne’s wealthy families, including pastoralists, merchants, military officers and professionals. As the 1895 MMBW Plan indicates, the area was dominated by mansions, such as Orrong, Mandeville Hall, Norla, Coonac and Ottowa.

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“Although Clendon and Irving Roads retain their original form, re-subdivision created a number of east-west roads linking these earlier roads. Grant Avenue is the result of the subdivision of Orrong’s much reduced, although still large estate. The mansion remained for some years, standing midway along Grant Avenue” (1).

Sadly no photographs or drawings of Orrong House have been discovered. There is a photograph from circa 1875 that shows four mansion houses situated in Toorak, with Orrong Road in front, but Orrong House is not in the photograph.


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The origin of the word “Orrong” before the mansion house circa 1850’s, is a mystery however. There is speculation that the word may have come from the Woi Wurrung language word “Wurrung” but there is no evidence to support this.


(1) Thank you to Janet, the Local History Librarian at Stonnington History Centre, Stonnington Library and Information Service, Malvern, Victoria, for her generous assistance in sharing the history of Orrong Road in Melbourne.


 

Orrong Road, [runs between multiple suburbs including], Lathlain, Rivervale, Carlisle, Belmont and Welshpool

Former name: Five previous streets, including Hawkstone Street, Carlisle

Official date of naming: 14 September 1937

Naming method: Approved by the Lieutenant-Governor of Western Australia in Executive Council, corr. 10860/06 under Section 10 of The Lands Act 1933-1934. Published in the Government Gazette of Western Australia, No. 44, Friday 17 September 1937, pp. 1565-1566.

Read the Government Gazette, 17 September 1937, pp. 1557 & 1565-1566.(PDF, 355KB)

Pinedale Street

Pinedale Street is in the suburb of East Victoria Park. This street is one that has been named because of geographical features in the area. In this case the street slopes down into what eludes to a ‘dale’, which means a valley. At the end of Pinedale Street, and currently running along most of the length of Jarrah Street are pine trees. Tall stately remnants of a pine forest of yesteryear. These pines were part of the former Collier Pine Plantation planted in the 1920s for the production of soft woods.

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Pinedale Street, East Victoria Park

  Former name:  Not applicable

  Official date of naming:  Unknown

  Naming method: Unknown     


Plummer Street

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Plummer Street in East Victoria Park was named in 1918 to honour Private Leslie Edward PLUMMER.  Leslie was a wireman by trade upon his enlistment in the Australian Imperial Force on the 26 June 1915. He was a member of the famed 11th Battalion. Leslie embarked for training at Tel-El-Kabir, Egypt on the ship Themistocles on the 13 September 1915, he was 21 years old. After completing training and suffering several admissions to hospital for influenza, Leslie arrived on the Western Front on the 5 April 1916. He was Killed in Action in France on the 30 May 1916, aged just 22.

Lest We Forget.

To discover more of Leslie’s story, see his entry in the:


Images: 

  • Plummer Street (sign), East Victoria Park.
  • 1917 'ILLUSTRATED SECTION', Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 13 April, p. 23. , viewed 30 Dec 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37988556.

Rouse Lane

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Rouse Lane in the suburb of East Victoria Park, is named in honour of Private Alfred Arthur ROUSE (5415).

Alfred was born and raised in Victoria Park. He had brown hair, brown eyes and was five foot, six inches tall. Alfred was 23 when he enlisted in the Australian Infantry Force in February 1916 and served in the 16th Battalion in World War I.

Alfred was Killed in Action at Bullecourt, France on 11 April 1917. He was 24 years old.

Alfred’s grave is known only unto God. In December 2016 the Town of Victoria Park decided to name one if the rights-of-way in the Town to honour Private Alfred Arthur Rouse. A tribute to Alfred’s service and the ultimate sacrifice he made for his country.

Lest We Forget.

 

Read more about Alfred in his entry in the Victoria Park Dictionary of Biography

 

 

Rouse Lane, East Victoria Park

Former name: Right-of-way (ROW) 66

Official date of naming: 13 December 2016

Naming method: A recommendation was submitted to the 13 December 2016 Ordinary Council Meeting (OCM) to rename right of way (ROW) 66. Councillors voted unanimously in favour of the recommendation which was formalised by resolution

Read Resolution 2016/12/15.9(PDF, 620KB)

     


Teague Street

Teague-Harold-Oscar-MBBS-Medical-Officer          Teague-Street-Victoria-Park-street-sign

Teague Street, Victoria Park is named in honour of Captain Harold Oscar Teague M.B.B.S* (1877-1917). Harold was a well-known and beloved local doctor, and was also the Health Officer of Victoria Park. Harold served in the Australian Army Medical Corps, Australian Imperial Force from 1 May 1915. In December 1916 he was assigned as Medical Officer to the 11th AIF Battalion. On 14 February 1917 he was Killed in Action in the trenches in France. 

Read more about the life and legacy of Harold in his entry in the:

Victoria Park Dictionary of Biography


 

Teague Street, Victoria Park

Former name: Walton Road
Official date of naming as Teague Street: 6 September 1918
Naming method: Approved by the Governor of Western Australia in Executive Council, corr. 816/18, under Section 7 of the Land Act, 1898. Published in the Government Gazette of Western Australia, no. 38, 6 September 1918, p. 1272. 


* Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery

Images:

  • Teague Street (sign), Victoria Park.
  • Harold Oscar Teague, MBBS, Medical Officer, Municipality of Victoria Park, Councillors photographic board, circa 1915-1916.

Washer Street

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Washer Street, St James is named in honour of Private Harry Izod Washer (1893-1917) Harry was born on 19 July 1893 in Sydney NSW to Friend and Elizabeth Washer. He was one of 11 children born to the couple, three of whom died in infancy. The Washer family moved to Western Australia around 1897 and lived in several locations within Victoria Park during Harry’s formative years. At the time of his enlistment in January 1916, Harry was a salesman by profession and lived in Sunbury Road, Victoria Park. Harry was 5 foot 11 inches and had grey eyes and light brown hair. Whilst serving with the 16th Battalion in France, Harry was Killed in Action on 5 February 1917. He has no known grave. 


Images:
  • Private Harry Izod Washer, 1917 'W.A. Soldiers Who Have Done Their Bit', Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954), 8 April, p. 6. (First Section), viewed 30 Dec 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58024517.
  • Washer Street (sign), St James.

 

  

Parks and Reserves

Charles Paterson Park

Named for Paterson, Charles Searl (1902 – 1967), refer to his biography in the:


Fraser Park

Fraser Park in East Victoria Park is named for James McIntosh FRASER (1889-1961) Perth City Councillor for the Victoria Park Ward 1928-1937. Later Federal Senator. Born in Scotland and emigrated to Australia at the age of 23 in 1911. Married Ellen SIMMONS in 1912. It would seem that Fraser Park was named first, as one of the bordering streets is Fraser Park Road, suggesting it was named after the Park.

Isaia Corner


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Image top right: Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd and Maria's Gift Shop, 684 Albany Highway, East Victoria Park, date unkown.


Isaia Corner is a small reserve on the corner of Miller Street and Albany Highway, next to the ‘peanut’ or ‘kidney’ roundabout in East Victoria Park. Rocco Isaia started R Isaia and Sons, a liqueur manufacturing company on the site in 1955. By 1961 R Isaia and Sons amalgamated with another business called Clarevale Wines and became Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd.


As Rocco Isaia Jnr recalls…”and then with the wines came a few other Australian spirits such as brandy, run and then slowly slowly as the business became more known and there was more demand we started to grow and expand and started including a lot of other products. We started importing from overseas you know the whisky, the gin, the vodka, the French brandy, bourbon, tequila, and we use to import all our flavourings and essences that we needed for the manufacturing of liqueurs from overseas, from Italy, France. And we used to buy the alcohol that was required for the manufacturing of liqueurs from Colonial Sugar. That was the spirit that we bought and the range of our products just grew you know we finished up with a very large range of products.”(1)


From the late 1960s “Maria’s Gift Shop” operated as part of the business and was very popular, staying in operation right till the business was closed in 1998. As Rocco Junior explains “ Dad [went] back home to Italy [in 1967]… while they were over there they sort of looked around and came back and they bought all this these gift lines and made contacts over there of suppliers of gift type products and that’s when they opened up a shop that we called Maria’s Gift Shop, which was right next door to the factory. Under the same roof! Because when Pop built the factory originally you know that was let out to real estate agents and things like that but then you know different people that were looking for office space in Victoria Park and then when they went to Italy and came across all these gift lines and gift ideas and chandeliers, crystal chandeliers and some beautiful Meranno Venetian glass wear and all that sort of stuff that they brought over. Some beautiful items! The chandeliers were exquisite and any way they more or less let the tenant know that they required the shop and that’s when they started the gift shop which went very well for a while there as well. My sister was running that for a while, my sister Mary. That’s who it was named after and you know that was in 19 say roughly 19…late ‘60s, ‘68, ’69 and they got the shop going and that was there pretty well right till the end, until you know we closed down the whole operation.”(1)


Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd was a distinctive landmark in the area and is well remembered by current and former residents, as well as by many people from the wider Perth area. The family themselves were well loved and respected community members also. The iconic pine tree in the park at Isaia Corner was planted by the Isaia family in what was then the backyard of their home and of their liqueur shop outlet. The exact date it was planted is unknown but aerial photographs show that is was planted sometime between 1953 and 1965. In 2002 the property was acquired by the State Government and a roundabout built at the intersection in 2002. In November 2008 the Council passed a recommendation to name Lot 52 (684) Albany Highway, the site of the former business, “Isaia Corner” in recognition of the family. In March 2019 the Right of way running from Miller Street, behind Isaia Corner and Albany Highway, through to Mint Street was named Isaia Lane in honour of the Isaia family business.

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In 2002 the property was acquired by the State Government and a roundabout built at the intersection in 2002. In November 2008 the Council passed a recommendation to name Lot 52 (684) Albany Highway, the site of the former business, “Isaia Corner” in recognition of the family. In March 2019 the Right of way running from Miller Street, behind Isaia Corner and Albany Highway, through to Mint Street was named Isaia Lane in honour of the Isaia family business.


References:

  1. ‘Interview with Rocco Isaia Jnr’ 2004, Jan McCahon Marshall, Victoria Park Library Oral History Collection.
  2. Town of Victoria Park 2019, Ordinary Council Meeting Minutes, 19 March 2019, Town of Victoria Park, Victoria Park, W.A., pp. 137-143.



Images below: Various 'flavours' of Isaia Liqueurs that are part of the Local History Collection, Town of Victoria Park Library Service. These bottles and others in the collection were donated in May 2020 by Brendan Beeson.

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John Bissett Reserve

Under construction.

Please check back soon.

John Macmillan Park

Under construction.

Please check back soon.

Manners Reserve

Manners Reserve in East Victoria Park is named for Manners Street on which it borders. The street was named for Thomas James Manners who was Killed in Action on 4 October 1916.

Raphael Park

Raphael Park in the suburb of Victoria Park is named for Howard Stirling Raphael (1900-1944)

Howard Raphael was a Councillor in the Victoria Park Ward of the Perth City Council (PCC) from 1924 and the Member of the Legislative Assembly for Victoria Park from 1930 until his death in 1944.

To read more of Howard's story see his article in the:

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Above: View across Raphael Park as seen from Armagh Street side, park sign in image (12 January 2021)


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Above: Row of ficus trees along side of Raphael Park facing Armagh Street, Victoria Park (12 January 2021)



Tom Wright Reserve (former name)

Under construction.

Please check back soon.

 

Former names of Lanes, Roads and Streets of Victoria Park

Hawkstone Street


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Don’t recognise the street? Don’t worry, you might not recognise the name of Hawkstone Street because it is the former name of part of the few streets that were combined to make the road we know today as Orrong Road, Carlisle.


Hawkstone Street first appeared in Wise’s Post Office Directories in 1914, meaning the street was there from around 1913*. Hawkstone Street was part of the development of Bickford Gardens by Peet & Co., and is the suburb we know today as Carlisle. Two people were registered to receive mail at properties in the street, but by 1915 that number had increased to ten. The numbers of people registered in the street staid around ten to 15.

 

James Thomas Peet (1862-1935) who founded Peet & Co. in 1895, lived in a house in Adelaide Terrace, Perth he named “Hawkstone”. He named his house after Hawkstone Hall in Shropshire, England, and it is believed he named the street in Bickford Gardens for his house.

 

Hawkstone Hall, Shropshire, England was established in 1707 by Richard Hill of Hawkstone (1655-1727). The Hall was set in 100 acres (40 ha) of gardens, follies and parklands which to this day attracts many tourists and is known as Hawkstone Park.

 

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Two land sale maps by Peet & Co. for Acreville Nos 1 & 2, show “Prospect Road” near and sometimes on, as if they were the same, as ‘Hawkstone Street’. ‘Prospect Road’ was actually one of the streets that was joined with Hawkstone Street to create Orrong Road in 1937.